The Elegy

Farewell you huntsmen, that did hunt the hare.
Farewell you hounds, that tired both horse and mare

Farewell you gallant faulkners, everyone
The chief of all did live at Snitterton

Get fromThe Elegy - The Dark Peak and The White
Oker Hill and trig point

Leonard Wheatcroft, a poet, tailor, and schoolmaster at Ashover in Derbyshire, reflects on lost friends and lost times. Along with his poem, he wrote:

The Poet’s view
Well known to yew,
To be too threw,
And so adieu
By me Leo Double Yew
Sixteen seventy tew.

Words by Leonard Wheatcroft, 1672

As I on Oaker-hill one day did stand,
Viewing the world which I could not command,
I turn’d my face tou’rd Berchore partly west,
To view where Greaveses us’d to have their nest;
But out, alas! I found they were all gone,
Not one was left to rest against a stone.

Then looking forward, the coast being very cleare,
At Rowther, there I found one Adam Eayre;
But now he’s gone, left house and land behind him,
So to be short I know not where to find him;
But if any counceller can make it out,
He’st have his land and I will go without.

I’ll up to Hassap to hear them sing a mass,
There I shall know who made the old man pass;
Death made it wrong, I send him to purgatory,
Where he must stay till he be fit for glory;
But if there be such a place ’twixt this and heaven,
I fear he cannot pass, ’tis so uneven.

Then did I to my panting muses say,
Haste and begone, you shall no longer stay (within this place);
Haste and begone, upon Calton top your banners,
And call at Haddon, where lived ould John Manners,
O use him kindly I strictly you command,
For he was kind to th’ poore of Ingland.

But now he’s gone, like others hence away,
Then for another Earle like him ever pray,
That will be kind both unto Rich and Poore,
Then God Almighty will increase his store,
And bless him here upon this earthly throne,
And at the last call him one of his owne.

Walking by the River, Stanton I did spye,
But neither Calton nor Bage saw I:
They are all gone and none left but old Boards,
Alas! Alas! What doth this world affordes.
There’s severall more that are slipt out o’ th’ way,
But not one word of them I here will say.

Then calling back my muses, mee thought I
Spyed Little Stancliffe standing pleasantly,
But not one Steare I’ th’ stall shall yet be seene;
Well fed win springs and deck’d with Lorrells green,
But one old Backer Bourning of the owne,
Till Steare retourne, there’ no one knows how sowne.

Then on the hills I came to Darley Hall,
To hear that music in those Ashes tall.
Listening awhile, I not being pleased well,
Thought I where is my pretty Cullen-bell,
Whose name and fame made all this vale once sound,
But now that honour’s buried under ground.

Besides your Parsons of Divinity
As Pain, and Pot, Edwards, and Mosley!
All four divines and men of noble birth,
All dead and gone and buried in the earth;
How can I chuse but must lament to see
My friends all gone who did make much of me.

Tho’ all in haste one place I have passed by,
That’s Cowley Hall, where oft I heard the cry
of great-mouthed doggs who did not feare to kill
What was their master’s pleasure, word, and will;
Hs name was Sinner, who ever did him know,
He’s dead and gone now many years ago.

Then turning round, all gone, thus did I thinke,
Where shall I make my friend or muses drinke;
Then looking down below I did espy
A pretty hall which stood me very ney,
Where lived the father, Son, and Wives of either
Both in my time, all-tho’ not both together.

A Knight the Father, and a Squire the Son,
One heir is left, if dead that name is done;
This heir being young, with ladies durst not play,
So he in sorrow quickly went away,
Leaving no heir o’ th’ name, no, not one,
so farewell Milwards now of Snitterton.

Then rushing forward down by Darwen side,
My muses presently through Matlock hied,
And finding there’d the good old pastur gone,
I hide to Riber the to make my mone;
But out, alas! My sorrows to increase,
That name is gone now buried under hears.

Wolley, Wolley, Wolley, farewell to thee,
A noble Esquire, thou was both kind and free
To all that come, I say, both rich and poore,
There’s few went empty that came to his doore.
Walker’s fair Hous is almost wore away,
With several more now going to decay.

To speak of Dedick what shall I do there,
Babbington’s Treason hateful doth appear;
Their house is down, and they are gone to nought,
So will all those which ere rebellion sought.
Then pray to God for peace and unity,
That King and nobles all all may well agree.

Then I to Ogston, there to break my fast,
They all in mourning stood at me agast,
To think my friend and lover was departed,
And so I left them almost broken hearted;
What shall I die thought I to hide my head,
Seeing so many gallants now are dead.

Then up by Amber I did quickly hey,
None of my ancient friends I could espey,
In Asher parish a I could find not one,
Old Crichton, and Dakon, and ould Hobskinsin,
They are departed and gone hence away,
As er self, I have not long to stay.

I will retourne unto my hill againe,
And cause my muses to sing out a straine,
And that in mourning too she shall be drest,
To sing new anthems of the very best.
And thus you see in a few days how they
Are all gone hence and tourned to dirt and clay.

Farewell you Huntsmen that did hunt the hare,
Farewell you Hounds that tired both horse and mare,
Farewell you gallant Falkners every one,
The chief of all did live at Snitterton.
So to conclude both greate and small,
Those that are left the Lord preserve them all.

By Bella Hardy

Farewell you huntsmen, that did hunt the hare
Farewell you hounds, that tired both horse and mare
Farewell you gallant faulkners everyone
The chief of all did live at Snitterton
So to conclude both great and small
Those that are left, the lord preserve them all

As I on Oker hill one day did stand
To view the world which I could not command
I turned my face to Birchover out west
To view where Greaveses used to have their nest
But out, alas! I found they were all gone
Not one was left to rest against a stone

I'll up to Hassop, to hear them sing a mass
And there I'll find who made the old man pass
Muses be gone, to Carlton top your banners
But call at Haddon, where lived old John Manners
Oh use him well, I strictly you command
For he was kind to the poor of Engerland

Farewell you huntsmen, that did hunt the hare
Farewell you hounds, that tired both horse and mare
Farewell you gallant faulkners everyone
The chiefs of all did live at Snitterton
So to conclude both great and small
Those that are left, the lord preserve them all

Click an image below to view a larger version.

You can buy this track from iTunes using the link below:

The Driving of the Deer - The Dark Peak and The White

Alternatively, the full album is available is available from Amazon, iTunes, Proper Music, HMV and Play.com.